LAB 3: Nutrition & Labels ABSTRACTS

20 Apr

For undergraduate research methods class, students all participated in the same lab.  The laboratory was designed to assess the influence of reading a nutritional booklet on subsequent looking at nutritional labels.   Students then had to write a paper in APA format.   Here we can see how about 20 different students wrote their abstracts.   Based on what we  have learned in class, let’s look at all of these abstracts and engage in the practice of “peer-review.” This is a great way to learn how to write an abstract. It is a beneficial exercise especially for non native speakers of English and a great way for people who have not taken Striano’s Research Method’s class to learn about abstract writing.

Now I have asked students in my class to review two abstract that they did not write. How do they critique each one? How would they suggest to rewrite it based on what we have learned in class?

Please choose an abstract that has not been reviewed 3 times.

This is also a way for the professor to see who has actually completed the assignment.   It makes grading really easy at the end of the semester. The assignment is due by midnight. Let’s see who is most likely to nail this assignment and is on the way to an A+ in  my Research Methods Class. NO PAIN. NO GAIN!

External visitors to the Research Methods BLOG are also encouraged to comment on these abstracts.  My class would love to hear from you!

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35 Responses to “LAB 3: Nutrition & Labels ABSTRACTS”

  1. LaDonna Martin April 20, 2010 at 9:08 pm #

    Nutrition plays an important role in health promotion and disease prevention. Many people these days are concerned about what they put into their bodies and how it can affect their health. The Nutrition Facts label is an easy way for you to find out which foods have lower fat or fewer calories. It also tells you which foods are healthier than others and which fall within specific dietary guidelines. Additionally, by using the food label, an individual can make good food choices. The objective of this study is to use information taken from an eye tracker to determine if individuals who review the nutrition education booklet will pay more attention to the nutrition label after the posttest compared to the pretest.

    • Jimmy Moscoso April 21, 2010 at 4:52 pm #

      Over all I liked this abstract I felt that it was a good view on telling the reader what the study was looking at which was nutritional facts. I felt that the author in the abstract should of added the number of participants, the basic finding, and the conclusion the researcher came to.

    • Katy Borisova April 22, 2010 at 12:41 am #

      I think this abstract would make a really great introduction to the paper. It is very well written and makes really strong and valid points. However, since this is an abstract, it would’ve been best to start off with “The objective of this study…” and leave the first part out (leave it for the actual paper). When a person reads over an abstract, the most important things they want to know are: what was the question, how did they go about running the study, and what did the study found. Therefore, I think the author should add more information about the actual experiment and the overall findings.

    • Vanessa Zhang April 22, 2010 at 2:43 am #

      overall this is a very good abstract, however I felt that this sentence “Additionally, by using the food label, an individual can make good food choices.” could have been worded in a better way. For example ” By using food labels we as individuals can make better food choices. “

  2. Angelica Briones April 21, 2010 at 3:24 am #

    Nutrition labels are important to many people and can become the reason of a person’s preference for certain foods and therefore the consumption of such. This study was conducted by a research methods student at Hunter College to examine the influence of nutrition education on nutrition label reading and/or interest. The hypothesis carried through out the experiment was that participants who received the nutrition education booklet were going to gaze more at the nutrition label in comparison to those who were not given the nutrition education booklet.

    • Mousumi Haider April 21, 2010 at 8:23 pm #

      Although the abstract gives us idea what the paper is about, I felt author should have added method section in abstract. We don’t know how many participants were in the study and how the study was conduct. The author didn’t mention the result of the study which is important for abstract.

  3. Katy Borisova April 21, 2010 at 1:39 pm #

    The influence of nutrition education on nutrition label reading was examined in this study. A total of 7 participants were recruited and randomly assigned to either control or experimental group. Participants were shown 5 images of cereal boxes along with their nutrition labels. An eyetracker was used to measure the amount of time gazing at the nutrition labels. The aim of the study was to test whether participants who received an information booklet about nutrition would gaze longer at the nutrition labels during their posttest than their pretest compared to the participants who completed a word search puzzle. The results of the study did not show significant difference for either group. These finding suggest that a nutrition booklet may not be the optimal technique for improving nutrition education.

    • Jimmy Moscoso April 21, 2010 at 4:54 pm #

      Overall i felt that this abstract was very well written. The author right at the start stated what the researcher was trying to find. Then she told us the number of participants and in short what the procedure was the participants wnet through. she then told us what the aim in the study was and then she explained to us the results the reasercher got and why it is important or not important. Overall well written and very is to comprehend.

    • Mousumi Haider April 21, 2010 at 7:48 pm #

      I thought, this abstract is well written. The author of the study told us what the paper is about in the first sentence. Then we know about the participants for the study which inform us about the method section. Knowing the hypothesis, we know the aim of the study. Also, the author mentions the result. The abstract cover all the parts of the study in 90 to 120 words. This is very well written abstract and the author followed the APA style format.

    • Brittany Padilla April 22, 2010 at 3:26 am #

      I think this abstract is beautifully written. It has a great flow and clearly sums up the study. We can tell the purpose of the study, we know how many participants, the method the results and what the results suggest. I would add an “a” though in the sentence “The results of the study did not show [a] significant difference for either group.” Other than that I think it’s great.

    • Kyra April 22, 2010 at 4:53 am #

      I think this abstract is great. It contains all components of the study, while managing to remain concise and to the point. APA format was followed well. Though the abstract does not go into detail about the way in which the study was conducted, the reader is still painted a clear picture and full comprehension is made possible.

    • Ankita Patel May 5, 2010 at 3:28 pm #

      Overall it was a good example of abstract.It included what the researcher was studying and the outcome of the study.

  4. Amanda Davis April 21, 2010 at 2:08 pm #

    This paper explores the influence that nutritional education has on reading nutritional labels.
    An experiment was created to collect eye gaze data amongst students using the Tobii T120 Eyetracker. Seven participants were used, 3 in the treatment and 4 in the control. Participants in the control group were asked to complete a word find puzzle before the eye test while participants in the treatment reviewed a nutrition education booklet prior to the test. It was predicted that after reading the nutrition education booklet the participant would spend more time gazing at the nutrition label than the product image.  Those who complete the word find puzzle will show little difference between their posttest and pretest. However these findings suggest there was no significant difference with time spent gazing at the label and receiving nutritional information prior to the test. It can be said that receiving previous information regarding nutrition will not effect the amount of time spent reading nutrition labels.

    • Vanessa Zhang April 22, 2010 at 2:45 am #

      Overall, i felt this abstract was great. Clearly written and it flows throughout the paragraphs. I especially like the first few words of the abstract ” this paper explores the influence ….”

    • Angelica Briones April 23, 2010 at 3:59 pm #

      I really liked this abstract. It was clear and there was no need to read it twice to understand what the study was about.

  5. Brittany April 21, 2010 at 2:14 pm #

    Nutrition labels are presented on almost everything we eat. Do people really read these labels and if so, are they looking at the appropriate information? The aim of this study is two see if a nutrition education booklet influences nutrition label reading. A total of 7 participants were involved in this study, 4 participants were placed in the treatment group (given the education booklet) and 3 participants were placed in the control group (given a crossword puzzle). Then using an eye-tracking device the participants viewed images of cereal boxes and nutrition labels and their viewing was tracked and recorded. We did not find a significant difference from the pre and posttest in the treated group, t(3) = -1.84, p = .162. Nor did we find a significant effect in the control group, t(2) = .405, p = .725. This paper also explains limitations that influenced our insignificant results.

    • Amanda Davis April 22, 2010 at 1:42 am #

      This abstract is very well written. I like how the participants were explained as well as the procedure. Everything is very clear and to the point. However, the statistics should not have been in the abstract and would have been more appropriate in the results section. I also like the question in the second sentence. Feels like it is enticing the reader.

  6. Jimmy Moscoso April 21, 2010 at 4:47 pm #

    Depending on the type of person you are, you might look at the cereal box picture more than the nutritional label. An experiment was proposed in which the researcher would you use a Tobii T120 Eyetracker to determine if people who were given a pretest in which the participant looked at cereal box front cover and nutritional label’s on the same computer monitor and then the participants either completed a word search (control group) or looked at a nutritional educational book. Then the participants took a post test which was exactly the same as the pre test. The researcher suggested that the treatment group will look more at the nutritional label during the post test compared to the pretest than those in the control group.

    • Amanda Davis April 22, 2010 at 1:49 am #

      Generally, this abstract gives you a good sense of what the paper and study are going to consist of. However, some minor adjustments could have been made to improve it like giving the actual number of participants in each group. Also, stating the significance of the study rather then just the predicted results. I also would have removed the first sentence and placed it into the actual paper itself and started off the paper with a sentence that more clearly states what the paper is exploring.

    • Angelica Briones April 23, 2010 at 4:47 pm #

      The study gives a general picture of what the study is about. However the sentences explaining the actual procedure of the study are a little vague. Other than that, the general picture is there!

  7. Mousumi Haider April 21, 2010 at 7:57 pm #

    This study was conducted to show that there is no influence on maintaining healthy diet after reading a nutritional education labels. In this experiment, I had two different groups. One group was control group with 3 participants (n=3). Other groups was treatment group with 4 participants (n=4). All together this study had total of 7 participants (N=7). For each group, participants were randomly selected without any preferences on age, gender, and occupations. The control group was asked to do the word find puzzle in between pretest and posttest of eye tracker. The treatment group was asked to read a nutritional education booklet in between pretest and posttest of eye tracker. For this particular study, I run the t-test. The result shows, there is no significant difference because the p-value is greater than .05 for both control and treatment group.

    • Katy Borisova April 22, 2010 at 1:17 am #

      Overall, the structure of the abstract is good and includes all the important details.
      However, it seems to me that the first sentence conflicts with the actual study since the study simply tested for nutrition label reading, which may or may not be directly related to the maintenance of healthy diets. I feel like it might need a bit of rewording. Also, some sentences could either be combined or eliminated to make the abstract more compact and to the point (for example, the five sentences describing participants could be successfully reduced to two). Finally, I think it’s sufficient to just mention that no significant difference was found without going into the details of the results.

  8. Vanessa Zhang April 22, 2010 at 2:40 am #

    Abstract
    This experiment was done to testing the influence of nutrition education of nutrition label reading. To see if we would notice the nutrition labels after we were educated and are they were on the box. There are two groups in this study. The control group was given pictures of different cereal boxes along with the nutrition information and asked to look at the pictures then given a crossword puzzle, and then pictures were looked at again. The treatment group was given pictures to look at then educated about nutrition with a nutrition education booklet and was then asked to look at the pictures again. The hypothesis for this study is that those were given the nutrition education booklet (treatment) will gaze and notice more at the nutrition label during the posttest in comparison to the pretest than those who complete the word puzzle and given no booklet (control).
    Keywords: nutrition education, nutrition labels, nutrition booklet.

    • Brittany Padilla April 22, 2010 at 3:12 am #

      It was a little hard for me to get through this abstract. The tenses throughout this abstract are not consistent. I would advise this author to read their writing out loud because it usually helps to find the sentences that don’t make sense. The first sentence, “this experiment was done to testing the influence…” should be changed to “this experiment was done to test the influence…” I am very unsure of what the second sentence means. After reading this abstract I get the idea that the author may have been confused by the procedure. The number of participants and findings of the study should also be included. Overall, I think this abstract is quite unclear and needs a lot of work.

    • Annie Tran April 22, 2010 at 4:22 am #

      I really love your short sentences. It makes reading a lot easier and allows the reader to fully comprehend the gist of your study! GREATTTTTT!

  9. Boris Kuslitskiy April 22, 2010 at 4:02 am #

    CUNY Hunter students were either primed with nutritional instruction or presented with a neutral control in the form of a crossword puzzle before being tested on the attention they paid to the product packaging of five cereals. Stimuli were presented on a computer screen and the participant’s response (attention) was measured using an eye-tracker. Our preliminary hypothesis was that nutritional priming would increase subsequent attention to nutritional labels as compared to the cereal’s logo. A sample of six students, contrary to our hypothesis, presented no significant results.

    • Annie Tran April 22, 2010 at 4:20 am #

      Awesome! Really concise and straight to the point!

    • Kyra April 22, 2010 at 4:40 am #

      I really like this abstract. It is clear, concise, and explains the experiment well. It was my understanding, however, that the study sample consisted of 7 participants, so I find this part a bit confusing. Also, the part that mentions “subsequent attention to nutritional labels as compared…” seems a bit wordy and confusing. Other than those two parts, I think the abstract is great.

      • Boris Kuslitskiy April 22, 2010 at 9:54 am #

        One of the participants in the SPSS data file had blank information. We weren’t told why it was blank and we weren’t told anything about that section of the experiment. Rather than assume (possibly incorrectly) that they or their results were dropped, I didn’t include them at all.

        Regarding the phrase, it is meant to be taken with the “priming would” introduction, though you are right, the abstract would probably benefit if it was broken up into more sentences.

  10. Anonymous April 22, 2010 at 4:04 am #

    This study investigates the influence of nutrition education on nutrition label reading. Using a t-test statistic, we hypothesize that participants who receive nutrition education will gaze longer at the nutrition label than participants who do not. Our experiment tested two groups, the control group (n=3) was given a crossword puzzle between their pre-test and post-test and the experimental group (n=3) was given the nutrition information between their pre-test and post-test. Participants were shown images of nutrition labels with their corresponding cereal boxes and eye gaze data was collected using an eye-tracking device. Even though our results illustrated nonsignificant results, we still believe that our hypothesis has merit and needs further research to support our hypothesis.

  11. Annie Tran April 22, 2010 at 4:26 am #

    I posted this earlier but noticed that it didn’t go through. So I’m resubmitting it. It’s probably because I posted it as anonymous and for some reason that wasn’t working out.

    This study investigates the influence of nutrition education on nutrition label reading. Using a t-test statistic, we hypothesize that participants who receive nutrition education will gaze longer at the nutrition label than participants who do not. Our experiment tested two groups, the control group (n=3) was given a crossword puzzle between their pre-test and post-test and the experimental group (n=3) was given the nutrition information between their pre-test and post-test. Participants were shown images of nutrition labels with their corresponding cereal boxes and eye gaze data was collected using an eye-tracking device. Even though our results illustrated nonsignificant results, we still believe that our hypothesis has merit and needs further research to support our hypothesis.

    Keywords: nutrition, nutrition label, cereal box, nutrition education, eye-tracking device

    • Boris Kuslitskiy April 22, 2010 at 4:41 am #

      Keywords! Nobody else used them, good thinking! Everything else, with the exception of my preferring “nutritional labels” to “nutrition labels,” looks perfect.

  12. Kyra April 22, 2010 at 4:36 am #

    Most foods in the United States are packaged and sold with nutrition labels. Nutrition labels affect the ways in which people choose which and how much of different foods to eat. This study examines the effect of nutritional education on the amount of time spent gazing at nutrition labels, when compared to completing a word find puzzle. In this experiment, results from a two-tailed, Paired Samples t-test of 7 participants reveal that gazing time at the nutritional label was not significantly longer for participants after reading the nutritional booklet (M = 3.06, SD = 2.10), t(3) = -1.85, p = .162, than for participants after completing the word find puzzle (M = 1.36, SD = 1.71), t(2) = .405, p = .725. These results support previous findings which suggest that a multimedia food label intervention may be more effective in improving understanding of nutritional food labels than traditional written materials. Follow up analyses may attempt to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the ways in which non-traditional forms of nutrition education may affect nutrition label use.

    • Boris Kuslitskiy April 22, 2010 at 5:17 am #

      I think this is great. You reference earlier findings and how this study’s results interact and play off of those. All the key points are here as well, so it’s not like you sacrificed vital information for the extra bits.

  13. Ankita Patel April 22, 2010 at 8:14 pm #

    Abstract
    This study examined the influence of nutrition education on nutrition label reading. It examined some of the aspects which influence people to read nutritional label. The treatment group and the control group were shown couple of cereal boxes with nutrition label on the computer. Then they were given to read different booklet for ten minutes. Treatment group was given a booklet with nutrition information and the control group was given to solve a puzzle. After ten minutes they were shown the cereal boxes with nutritional label once again. The eye tracker tracked where the participants were looking at before and after reading the booklet. On average people who were given educational booklet focused more on nutritional label of cereal boxes compared to people who were given a puzzle to solve, they didn’t focus much on nutrition label. There are limitations to this study and further research can be conducted for better results.

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